TWD Magazine 3rd Collection Interview: Stallion Dunquis, TWD Magazine 3rd Collection Contributor — Poetry Contributor

The Wire's Dream Magazine Logo
As an extension of The Black Lion Journal’s mission, The Wire’s Dream is a semi-annual magazine that values community, life perspectives, and different worldviews. Contributors were asked to complete a set of mini interview questions with the purpose of sharing with the readers and their fellow submitters a bit about who they are and about their creativity. All questions were the same for each contributor; and each answer given is unique, open, friendly, and candid.

About Creativity

Let’s start by talking about creativity — what does creativity mean to you?

Escapism, pure fun.

How and when did you get started doing what you love to do? Who or what is your creative muse?

My muse is Estefanía. I’ve been writing since I was 7.

What is your most memorable creative experience, if any?

I acted in The Merchant of Venice as part of a Shakespeare course at university.
The two teachers were brilliant! They allowed me to write and perform music for
the production, as well.

People approach creativity in such different ways! What about you? What is your creative routine? Do you know of any quirky habits or creative superstitions?

Lighting candles. Boiling cinnamon sticks and vanilla extract on the stove.
Listening to classical music.

Time, Tips, & Future Goals

How do you make time to do what you love to do?

The night is always young.

What tips can you give novice creatives about getting started on their creative journey and about submitting their work for publication?

Harbor no expectations for your submissions. If someone likes your work, engage
that person with the utmost gratitude. Get away from writing—go to the movies,
go dancing.

What do you hope to achieve with your creativity? Where would you like to see yourself in about 5 years, professionally and creatively?

In 2023 I see myself living in Paris and owning a bulldog named Claude.

— TWD Magazine 3rd Collection—

About Stallion

Stallion Dunquis, TWD Magazine 3rd Collection Contributor

Stallion Dunquis is a poet and singer based in New York City. Sonnets from Dunquis have recently appeared in Porridge Magazine and Rag Queen Periodical.
Facebook / Instagram & Twitter: @stalliondunquis

Read Stallion’s Poetry In TWD Magazine 3rd Collection

“Air” — p. 29
“Piel en Piel” — p. 55
“Nausea” — p. 57
“Advice From Ernie” — p. 86
“Merlot” — p. 89

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TWD Magazine 3rd Collection Interview: Scott Laudati — Poetry Contributor

The Wire's Dream Magazine Logo
As an extension of The Black Lion Journal’s mission, The Wire’s Dream is a semi-annual magazine that values community, life perspectives, and different worldviews. Contributors were asked to complete a set of mini interview questions with the purpose of sharing with the readers and their fellow submitters a bit about who they are and about their creativity. All questions were the same for each contributor; and each answer given is unique, open, friendly, and candid.

About Creativity

Let’s start by talking about creativity — what does creativity mean to you?

It’s everything that staring into a cellphone all day isn’t.

How and when did you get started doing what you love to do? Who or what is your creative muse?

I started writing way before I ever put a pen to paper. But it was probably for the same reason everyone else starts: I wasn’t cool. I find locations to be the best muse. Derelict motels full of residents on the sides of interstates are good. In the back of the Korean buses on the way to Buffalo is another one that works.

What is your most memorable creative experience, if any?

When I got my first book published I was able to finally say, “I did it”.

People approach creativity in such different ways! What about you? What is your creative routine? Do you know of any quirky habits or creative superstitions?

The only way to write is to stay up later than everyone else. No superstitions, I guess. Although I think I’ve prayed or cursed anything that could be up in the sky at some point while writing.

Time, Tips, & Future Goals

How do you make time to do what you love to do?

It’s very hard, but being awake while everyone else is sleeping is the best way to find solitude.

What tips can you give novice creatives about getting started on their creative journey and about submitting their work for publication?

I think there’s a publisher out there for everyone. I’ve had a book deal fall through and now in hindsight it was the best thing that could’ve happened. It got published eventually by Kuboa Press and the guy who runs it, Pablo D’Stair, and his brother Carlos Gonzalez, have become great friends and Yoda-like mentors. Basically the point is, submit to every place you can find online. Just at the second I was going to quit for good everything came together. And that has happened in some capacity 100 times since. You’re always against the ropes as a writer. Just remember, you’ve only got a couple decades to get it out, so get to work.

What do you hope to achieve with your creativity? Where would you like to see yourself in about 5 years, professionally and creatively?

I’d like to make $900 off book sales every month so I can move to Italy and never see a Republican and eat fresh sardines every day. And once a month go read at Shakespeare & Co. I’d also like a good dog to share all of that with.

— TWD Magazine 3rd Collection—

About Scott

TWD Magazine 3rd Collection Interview: Scott Laudati — Poetry Contributor

Scott Laudati lives in NYC with his boxer, Satine, He is the author of Hawaiian Shirts In The Electric Chair (poems) and Play The Devil (novel). His new book of poems, Bone House, will be available soon. Visit him on instagram @scottlaudati

You Can Find Scott Here

Twitter @ScottLaudati

View Scott’s Book Trailer For Bone House

Read Scott’s Poetry In TWD Magazine 3rd Collection

“My Suitcase Is Packed” — p. 56

TWD Magazine 3rd Collection Interview: Darren C. Demaree — Poetry Contributor

The Wire's Dream Magazine Logo
As an extension of The Black Lion Journal’s mission, The Wire’s Dream is a semi-annual magazine that values community, life perspectives, and different worldviews. Contributors were asked to complete a set of mini interview questions with the purpose of sharing with the readers and their fellow submitters a bit about who they are and about their creativity. All questions were the same for each contributor; and each answer given is unique, open, friendly, and candid.

About Creativity

Let’s start by talking about creativity — what does creativity mean to you?

Creativity is the ability to find the artistic tether, hold it with both hands, and then try to do as many different things as possible with it.

How and when did you get started doing what you love to do? Who or what is your creative muse?

I started writing poetry in high school. I don’t remember why.

What is your most memorable creative experience, if any?

I wrote my book “The Nineteen Steps Between Us” in four days. It was a fun and crazy four days to produce an 88-page book that got published the same year.

People approach creativity in such different ways! What about you? What is your creative routine? Do you know of any quirky habits or creative superstitions?

I write every day. It’s when I get my coffee, and it’s the only time I have any sugar. By the time I taste the coffee I’m ready to write.

Time, Tips, & Future Goals

How do you make time to do what you love to do?

Dedication to a very specific routine.

What tips can you give novice creatives about getting started on their creative journey and about submitting their work for publication?

Write all the time. Submit all the time. Don’t take any rejection personally. Celebrate a little bit with any acceptance.

What do you hope to achieve with your creativity? Where would you like to see yourself in about 5 years, professionally and creatively?

I just want to keep writing every day. I don’t know what that will bring accomplishment-wise, but I’ll have written a lot more poetry. More poetry is always a good thing.

— TWD Magazine 3rd Collection—

About Darren

Darren C. Demaree’s poems have appeared, or are scheduled to appear in numerous magazines/journals, including Diode, Meridian, New Letters, Diagram, and the Colorado Review.

Demaree is the author of six poetry collections, most recently Many Full Hands Applauding Inelegantly (2016, 8th House Publishing). Demaree’s seventh collection Two Towns Over was selected as the winner of the Louise Bogan Award by Trio House Press, and is scheduled to be released in March of 2018. Demaree is the Managing Editor of the Best of the Net Anthology and Ovenbird Poetry.

Read Darren’s Poetry In TWD Magazine 3rd Collection

[call it what you will] — p. 58
[you can take apart the couch] – p. 115

TWD Magazine 3rd Collection Interview: Matt Nagin — Poetry Contributor

The Wire's Dream Magazine Logo
As an extension of The Black Lion Journal’s mission, The Wire’s Dream is a semi-annual magazine that values community, life perspectives, and different worldviews. Contributors were asked to complete a set of mini interview questions with the purpose of sharing with the readers and their fellow submitters a bit about who they are and about their creativity. All questions were the same for each contributor; and each answer given is unique, open, friendly, and candid.

About Creativity

Let’s start by talking about creativity — what does creativity mean to you?

Creativity has a great deal to do with listening. Creative types, particularly writers, have an antenna–they pick up wavelengths/frequencies–that, hopefully, lead them to the promised land (successful work). This is particularly the case with poetry. Often creative phrases pop into the skull that later become a poem. Mozart I read heard whole symphonies! So creativity, to me, is first and foremost about listening; and, secondarily, about following–meaning following what you heard–and letting the creative process carry you away–like a tide pushing a wave to shore. Thirdly, after the first draft is complete (listening and following), it is about the Apollonian grunt work–crafting, perfecting, editing–to realize the original impetus behind the work or even something a bit more than originally intended.

How and when did you get started doing what you love to do? Who or what is your creative muse?

I started at age 16. Depression led me to it. I was down and, at the time, was keeping all my anger and sadness buried deep within. I filled up countless notebooks with poems–and this had a therapeutic effect. I wouldn’t say I have one muse. I have multiple. It always changes. I think it is great to find new inspirations–and to look for them in unique places. I don’t like poetry that is forced; that TRIES to be inspirational–this all seems phony as hell to me. Just be honest. That is one secret with writing. Or, as Chekov put it, “a writer must be as objective as a chemist….he must know that dungheaps play a very reasonable part in a landscape.”

What is your most memorable creative experience, if any?

I suppose my most memorable creative experience was the first time I put on a one man show and my parents were in the audience. They never liked my work. Always, pretty much, were discouraging. But they laughed a great deal at this comedic show and the overall response was very positive that night. After that they had more respect for my artistic pursuits and my confidence increased. It was kind of a redemptive/transformative moment…to a certain extent…as I obtained a degree of validation I never seemed able to obtain before that.

People approach creativity in such different ways! What about you? What is your creative routine? Do you know of any quirky habits or creative superstitions?

I try to write every day. One important thing I started doing in recent years is directing far more of my creative energies into completing projects. In the past I would follow my inspiration–constantly starting new projects. But I learned–as enjoyable as that is–I need to slow down and polish. It is tough, sometimes, sticking with one project–and again and again revising it. But, stick with it, and very often it pays dividends.

Time, Tips, & Future Goals

How do you make time to do what you love to do?

There really isn’t any choice for me. If I don’t write I become unpleasant. So I make time. Put other matters on the back burner. Sometimes I alienate friends or relatives or have unpaid bills or my clothes don’t look so sharp, but, for me, this all is a worthy sacrifice.

What tips can you give novice creatives about getting started on their creative journey and about submitting their work for publication?

Write every day. Don’t judge your own work too harshly. Just give yourself the freedom to play. Over time a craft and a sense of voice will emerge. Everyone grows at their own pace. Don’t compare yourself too much with your peers. Try not to get lost in bitterness and jealousy. Just stay disciplined and brick by brick complete work and, when ready, put it out there. Rejections can be tough. They can even hurt your creative output and induce extreme insecurity. But use the rejections to get stronger inside and fight harder and write more frequently to get beyond them. You are rejected now so you can be accepted later–with a new level of depth. Some of the best writers, for quite some time, were getting rejected. Don’t focus on it. Focus on where you are headed. And hopefully, with time, you will get where you need to go.

What do you hope to achieve with your creativity? Where would you like to see yourself in about 5 years, professionally and creatively?

I want to finish more projects than in the past and create at higher levels. My immediate goals are a humor book (filled with short satires), a poetry book, and, when those are finished, a novel I started over ten years ago (and have yet to complete). In five years I hope to be more established as a creative voice on the literary scene and have a larger, built-in fan base. Finally, I’d like to in some way give back–other than teaching–by helping other writers through some kind of foundation, grant, or other charitable activity.

— TWD Magazine 3rd Collection—

About Matt

Matt Nagin is a writer, educator, actor, filmmaker and standup comedian. His poetry has been published in Antigonish Review, Dash Literary Journal, The Charles Carter, Grain Magazine and Arsenic Lobster, among other markets. His first poetry collection, Butterflies Lost Within The Crooked Moonlight, was released in 2017, and has obtained very strong reader reviews. More info at mattnagin.com.

You Can Find Matt Here

WEB: mattnagin.com
EMAIL: mattnagin@gmail.com
TWITTER: @MNAGIN
INSTAGRAM: @NAGINPLEASE
IMDB: imdb.com/name/nm4263194/
YOUTUBE: mattbrian12345678
POETRY BOOK: http://www.amazon.com/Butterflies
FILM SITE: http://www.insidejobthemovie.com

Read Matt’s Poetry In TWD Magazine 3rd Collection

“Hermit On The Subway” — p. 94

TWD Magazine 3rd Collection Interview: Kevin A. Risner — Poetry Contributor

The Wire's Dream Magazine Logo
As an extension of The Black Lion Journal’s mission, The Wire’s Dream is a semi-annual magazine that values community, life perspectives, and different worldviews. Contributors were asked to complete a set of mini interview questions with the purpose of sharing with the readers and their fellow submitters a bit about who they are and about their creativity. All questions were the same for each contributor; and each answer given is unique, open, friendly, and candid.

About Creativity

Let’s start by talking about creativity — what does creativity mean to you?

To me, it’s such a general word. I think of the process of creation itself, the idea that we are all creators of something. What can I put together and how can I refine it — so that what I have formed can affect someone or multiple people? How can I make my words effective, moving? How can I paint with words and sentences, just like an artist or sculptor might fashion something for the public or even for the self?

How and when did you get started doing what you love to do? Who or what is your creative muse?

I began to read whatever book I found when I was very young, even if I couldn’t read the actual words. That transferred over to writing. I wrote whenever I could, whatever I could. It would sometimes be when I should have been doing classwork in grade school. I wrote mysteries, science fiction stuff, outlandish narratives. Sometimes a mimicry of what I’d just read. My muses are endless: my wife always inspires me, nature can be invigorating, and my dreams are an endless stream for me to dip into and enjoy. Current political and global issues also move me to grab my pen.

What is your most memorable creative experience, if any?

Nothing jumps at me right now. I’ve had moments when I need to scramble for my notebook to get an idea or an experience written down. I’ve been a part of writing groups, which has been helpful in writing down a poem or a narrative piece — with just one word or one situation as the spark.

People approach creativity in such different ways! What about you? What is your creative routine? Do you know of any quirky habits or creative superstitions?

I try to write down something every day. I’m sort of successful at that — but not always. Placing a notebook by my bed helps me whenever I have a dream that sticks and is memorable to me. I need to have coffee or another stimulant (tea works, so does beer or wine!) … and I need to be ready, though sometimes being ready doesn’t happen and I just have to write. Just do it. I’ve written “writing time” in my calendar before, but that’s normally when I get super busy and I don’t give myself the necessary time to do it.

Time, Tips, & Future Goals

How do you make time to do what you love to do?

That’s just it. I make the time. I have to. I have to tell myself to take a break: so that means go to the gym or the trails and get running. That means head to a cafe for some coffee, try a new beer at one of the local breweries. That means designate a time to be with people I care about. That means go out to eat with my wife. And I can’t just think — “you know, I should be doing such and such” — I have to do them. To act.

What tips can you give novice creatives about getting started on their creative journey and about submitting their work for publication?

Read. Read a lot. Read a variety of work. Read work written by people that are different from you. Read work from underrepresented voices. It’s important to read, to listen, to experience as much as one can. It’s important to have willingness: to learn, to try, to get organized, to open that notebook (or computer), to write, to write anything and everything. The connections will come. The narrative arcs will appear. When submitting, one must be willing to take on that part-time job. Ask people what they do, take a deep breath, allow for rejection to overpower you, expect rejection, expect it often, and don’t be discouraged!

What do you hope to achieve with your creativity? Where would you like to see yourself in about 5 years, professionally and creatively?

I want to move people. I want to inspire people. I want to reach people from all walks of life and from different backgrounds. I want everyone to reconsider their present state — their reality, their beliefs, their biases, their future. I want people to gain perspective, gain empathy, learn to love and help those who are struggling. In five years, I still would love to be teaching writing and narrative to a diverse and excited group of students. In five years, I would love to compile and publish a much larger poetry collection. In five years, I would love to have a completed prose piece. There is a lot buzzing around in my head; hopefully a lot of what’s up there can land cohesively and form something worthwhile and inspiring for others.

— TWD Magazine 3rd Collection—

About Kevin

TWD Magazine 3rd Collection Interview: Kevin A. Risner — Poetry Contributor
Kevin A. Risner is currently ESL Coordinator at the Cleveland Institute of Art. His work can be found multiple places online — including Rising Phoenix Review, Rise Up Review, the murmur house, and others. His first chapbook, My Ear is a Sieve, has recently been published by Bottlecap Press. He enjoys reading, running, and a nice scotch — but not all at the same time (though that would be quite an impressive feat).

You Can Find Kevin Here

Twitter: @mr_december
Instagram: mrdecemberist
Website: kevinrisner.com

Read Kevin’s Poetry In TWD Magazine 3rd Collection

“December” — p. 19
“Time” — p. 40

TWD Magazine 3rd Collection Interview: Andy Stallings — Poetry Contributor

The Wire's Dream Magazine Logo
As an extension of The Black Lion Journal’s mission, The Wire’s Dream is a semi-annual magazine that values community, life perspectives, and different worldviews. Contributors were asked to complete a set of mini interview questions with the purpose of sharing with the readers and their fellow submitters a bit about who they are and about their creativity. All questions were the same for each contributor; and each answer given is unique, open, friendly, and candid.

About Creativity

Let’s start by talking about creativity — what does creativity mean to you?

Creativity is largely combinatory to me. I don’t often set out to write something that is free from influence, whether direct or indirect. Usually, if what I’m doing is something I’d call “creative,” I’m doing it with an idea to form something new to my own process which is, however, derived of many sources.

How and when did you get started doing what you love to do? Who or what is your creative muse?

I began to write poetry about 15-20 years ago, upon deciding to no longer pursue jazz saxophone as a creative mode. I first attempted to write fiction, then found poetry was what moved me the most. I suppose the closest thing to a muse that I follow is absence.

What is your most memorable creative experience, if any?

Probably a musical experience — playing and recording a collection of cover songs for my wife, with friends and energy, in August of 2004.

People approach creativity in such different ways! What about you? What is your creative routine? Do you know of any quirky habits or creative superstitions?

The thing I do most that ultimately leads to creative work is freewriting. I freewrite with each of my classes (I’m a high school English teacher) for ten minutes at the start of each period. It isn’t magic or anything like that, but it’s a practice.

Time, Tips, & Future Goals

How do you make time to do what you love to do?

My job and my family life are very demanding, and most of the time I choose to love those things. My creative work is in the background through most of each year, and yet I find at the end of every year that I’ve done a lot of writing. I’m not sure how that happens.

What tips can you give novice creatives about getting started on their creative journey and about submitting their work for publication?

Just like with writing, it helps to have an organized process for submitting work for publication. It’s helped me to get completed poems organized in groups, and then I’m able to research and submit to journals, presses, and other publication outlets when I have a spare bit of time. Without being organized ahead of time, I’d be likelier to read the news in that bit of time.

What do you hope to achieve with your creativity? Where would you like to see yourself in about 5 years, professionally and creatively?

If all goes how it’s gone before, I would be unable to answer that question from this point in time. I’d like to be able to say that my poetry has continued to change.

— TWD Magazine 3rd Collection—

About Andy

TWD Magazine 3rd Collection Interview: Andy Stallings — Poetry Contributor
Andy Stallings lives in Deerfield, MA, where he teaches English and poetry at Deerfield Academy. He taught several years at Tulane University prior to that, and has published a book of poems, To the Heart of the World with Rescue Press (2014). He has four young children, and coaches cross country running.

Read Andy’s Poetry In TWD Magazine 3rd Collection

“Paradise” — p. 24
“Paradise” — p. 29
“Paradise” — p. 88

TWD Magazine 3rd Collection Interview: Trista Hurley-Waxali — Fiction Contributor

The Wire's Dream Magazine Logo
As an extension of The Black Lion Journal’s mission, The Wire’s Dream is a semi-annual magazine that values community, life perspectives, and different worldviews. Contributors were asked to complete a set of mini interview questions with the purpose of sharing with the readers and their fellow submitters a bit about who they are and about their creativity. All questions were the same for each contributor; and each answer given is unique, open, friendly, and candid.

About Creativity

Let’s start by talking about creativity — what does creativity mean to you?

It means the opportunity to get involved in spreading a message or bringing awareness for change. Whether it is an individual or community, something to get the conversation started in a space that is comfortable for all.

How and when did you get started doing what you love to do? Who or what is your creative muse?

It would be nice to say when I was a child I wrote in a diary which contained epic stories and poems but that is just not true. I dropped out of law school and gave myself some space to think of what I truly wanted in life. Writing and life became my muse.

What is your most memorable creative experience, if any?

When I shared the stage in Helsinki for a Translate show put on by their poetry organizers. The host spoke both English and Finnish and translated 3 of my pieces that we co-read together. It was very early in my career and I had so much interest by just watching the audience listen to two languages of my words.

People approach creativity in such different ways! What about you? What is your creative routine? Do you know of any quirky habits or creative superstitions?

Ha! A creative routine is exactly what I aim to maintain at home. Each morning I have my coffee and write about what thrilled me the night before, I start with a place and a moment and the rest builds itself. Sometimes it goes nowhere and I make a note of why and sometimes it brings me to why I went out in the first place.

Time, Tips, & Future Goals

How do you make time to do what you love to do?

I build healthy boundaries around things I don’t love to do, like running errands. I don’t overwhelm myself with doing everything when they need to be done and maybe run all my errands when the mood suits me best. I try to make things I don’t love to do a time for my mind to rest and then I don’t hate it but I don’t love it either.

What tips can you give novice creatives about getting started on their creative journey and about submitting their work for publication?

Keep your head up. Rejection is hard and it gets harder with age, so when you’re starting at a young or old age, you think rejection is behind you, try again, writing is all about how you manage with rejection. So take rejection and failure in stride and write a list of healthy activities you should do when you feel bogged down, such as, visit a gallery, get a dessert at a cafe without any electronics, bring a book that has nothing to do with what you’re focused on and maybe splurge on some shopping.

What do you hope to achieve with your creativity? Where would you like to see yourself in about 5 years, professionally and creatively?

I asked myself this 5 years ago, and the answer is the same. Publishing and reaching out to the literary community for tips and advice on how to make the next 5 years easier. There are no simple formulas and there will be bumps along the way but if you ask yourself where you want to be at the end of the month, say, published in a journal, then aim for that. Keep focused and a year or two or five will go by before you know it.

— TWD Magazine 3rd Collection—

About Trista

Trista Hurley-Waxali just finished a stint living in LA for 6 years and is looking forward to her next adventure. She has performed at Avenue 50, Stories Bookstore and internationally at O’bheal in Ireland and for Helsinki Poetry Connection. She writes weird short stories and is working on her novel, At This Juncture.

You Can Find Trista Here

Twitter: @Tristaisshort
Website: tristaisshort.wordpress.com

Read Trista’s Fiction In TWD Magazine 3rd Collection

“Stay Right” — p. 132

TWD Magazine 3rd Collection Interview: Brendan Walsh — Poetry Contributor

The Wire's Dream Magazine Logo
As an extension of The Black Lion Journal’s mission, The Wire’s Dream is a semi-annual magazine that values community, life perspectives, and different worldviews. Contributors were asked to complete a set of mini interview questions with the purpose of sharing with the readers and their fellow submitters a bit about who they are and about their creativity. All questions were the same for each contributor; and each answer given is unique, open, friendly, and candid.

About Creativity

Let’s start by talking about creativity — what does creativity mean to you?

Creativity is the undying, inescapable urge to put something where nothing was.

How and when did you get started doing what you love to do? Who or what is your creative muse?

I started writing poems in the second grade because I wanted to make the most beautiful language. My first poem was called “Spring” and I really wanted to capture how the flowers stunned my seven-year-old vocabulary. I write poems because I want to put the harsh, sometimes-horrible world inside the beautiful capsule of my brain. I want to tell stories.

What is your most memorable creative experience, if any?

Writing my third book, ‘Buddha vs. Bonobo’, in semi-secret at my desk in an office job over the span of a few months. My colleagues and I would block off fifteen minutes a few times per week and we’d write whatever we could (we were supposed to be working, of course). It felt dangerous to be composing these poems about jungles and great apes and free love in a stuffy office, where I could be caught and reprimanded. Also, of course, my years in Laos and South Korea were extremely valuable for my creative life in ways I can’t quite describe.

People approach creativity in such different ways! What about you? What is your creative routine? Do you know of any quirky habits or creative superstitions?

I try to write poems at 5am when I wake up. I create in large bursts of energy and then retreat for awhile. I might write thirty poems in thirty days and then nothing for two months. The routine is coffee, sit, and write, sometimes with a clear concept in mind, other times with absolutely nothing at all.

Time, Tips, & Future Goals

How do you make time to do what you love to do?

I get up before everyone else.

What tips can you give novice creatives about getting started on their creative journey and about submitting their work for publication?

Write first and don’t think about it–when you think you lose the spark. Read everything out loud ten to twenty times. Find quality mentors and consult/correspond–ideally they’re much older than you. Submit as soon as possible so you can get used to rejections. Once your work has been rejected a dozen times or so, start revising. Repeat, and never let it damage your soul!!!!

What do you hope to achieve with your creativity? Where would you like to see yourself in about 5 years, professionally and creatively?

I hope to publish five more books in five years. I also hope to continue teaching writing. Mostly though, I’d like to feel more comfortable and confident with periods of non-creation or deep experimentation. It’s tough to move away from a routine when it works and it feels good, but I hope five years from now (assuming the world hasn’t ended) that I’m less concerned with efficiency (I hope I’ll have earned some time by then).

— TWD Magazine 3rd Collection—

About Brendan

TWD Magazine 3rd Collection Interview: Brendan Walsh — Poetry Contributor
Brendan Walsh has lived and taught in South Korea, Laos, and South Florida. His work appears in Glass Poetry, Indianapolis Review, Wisconsin Review, Mudfish, Lines + Stars, and other journals. He is the author of Make Anything Whole (Five Oaks) and Go (Aldrich). His chapbook, Buddha vs. Bonobo, was published in October 2017 by Sutra Press. He’s online at www.brendanwalshpoetry.com.

You Can Find Brendan Here:

Instagram: @brendanwalshy
Twitter: @bwalshpoetry

Read Brendan’s Poetry In TWD Magazine 3rd Collection

“The Minimalists Prepare For Impending Apocalypse” — p. 52
“Hurricane Poem for the Colonizers” — p. 58

TWD Magazine 3rd Collection Interview: ayaz daryl nielsen — Poetry Contributor

The Wire's Dream Magazine Logo
As an extension of The Black Lion Journal’s mission, The Wire’s Dream is a semi-annual magazine that values community, life perspectives, and different worldviews. Contributors were asked to complete a set of mini interview questions with the purpose of sharing with the readers and their fellow submitters a bit about who they are and about their creativity. All questions were the same for each contributor; and each answer given is unique, open, friendly, and candid.

About Creativity

Let’s start by talking about creativity — what does creativity mean to you?

poetry reflects the depth and ongoing growth of an individual’s immersion in the interaction/interplay of heart and world lived in

How and when did you get started doing what you love to do? Who or what is your creative muse?

driving out of Estes Park, CO, the road signs created a brief poem which I wrote down, sent off, and it was published – discovered Rumi shorty thereafter, and asked a lady friend, a Sufi teacher (as was Rumi) for a poet’s name- thus, Ayaz.

What is your most memorable creative experience, if any?

so many, as I reread (some) of the poems I’ve written, and, especially, when I read another’s poetry that especially moves me

People approach creativity in such different ways! What about you? What is your creative routine? Do you know of any quirky habits or creative superstitions?

no routine, too quirky and superstitious

Time, Tips, & Future Goals

How do you make time to do what you love to do?

whenever can, considering all that needs to be in a day/whenever so moved

What tips can you give novice creatives about getting started on their creative journey and about submitting their work for publication?

the creative journey is what’s important, submit where/when/if you are so moved

What do you hope to achieve with your creativity? Where would you like to see yourself in about 5 years, professionally and creatively?

to just continue (as in “the dude abides”)

— TWD Magazine 3rd Collection—

About ayaz daryl nielsen

TWD Magazine 3rd Collection Interview: ayaz daryl nielsen — Poetry Contributor
ayaz daryl nielsen was born in Valentine, Nebraska, attended schools in Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Monterrey, Mexico, has lived in Bonn, Germany, and now lives in Longmont, Colorado, with beloved wife Judith. A veteran, former hospice nurse, ex-roughneck (as on oil rigs), he has been editor of the print publication bear creek haiku for 30+ years and over 140 issues. ayaz can be found online at bear creek haiku – poetry, poems and info. His poetry, published worldwide, includes senryu chosen in 2010 and 2012 as “best of year” by the Irish Haiku Association, the poetry chapbook Window Left Open from Prolific Press, and, with other deeply appreciated honors, is especially delighted by the depth and quality of poets worldwide whose poems have found homes in bear creek haiku’s print and online presence.

Read ayaz daryl nielsen’s Poetry In TWD Magazine 3rd Collection

“Beyond An Open Window” — p. 26
“Vagabond Scripture” — p. 51
“The Ballad Of Our Hearts” — p. 57

TWD Magazine 3rd Collection Interview: Melanie Faith — Photography Contributor

The Wire's Dream Magazine Logo
As an extension of The Black Lion Journal’s mission, The Wire’s Dream is a semi-annual magazine that values community, life perspectives, and different worldviews. Contributors were asked to complete a set of mini interview questions with the purpose of sharing with the readers and their fellow submitters a bit about who they are and about their creativity. All questions were the same for each contributor; and each answer given is unique, open, friendly, and candid.

About Creativity

Let’s start by talking about creativity — what does creativity mean to you?

Great question! Creativity means not knowing the end result but enjoying the delightful possibilities along the way. Creativity means the ability to follow new ideas and thoughts and explore my place in the world as a photographer, writer, teacher, friend, sister, daughter, and auntie. Creativity means using different forms of art to express various moods and inspirations. Creativity means recording, sculpting, and sharing with an audience I may know personally or may meet personally through my work. Creativity means the silence and precious time to pursue my passions. I think I could write about this all day, and in fact I did write a lot about creativity in my forthcoming craft book (Vine Leaves Press) for flash fiction and nonfiction writers; the subject of creativity is fertile ground, both individually and collectively.

How and when did you get started doing what you love to do? Who or what is your creative muse?

I asked for a camera for years and then the year I stopped asking for one, around middle school, my parents bought me a Kodak 110 (robin’s egg blue-colored) that I loved. I was more well-known for writing for the years of my schooling. After graduate school for my MFA in poetry, both online courses and digital photography blossomed and I began to explore the possibilities at a more-serious level. I took a very cool still-life photography course from a British photographer about five years ago that encouraged me and showed me just how much I had yet to learn and explore. I started to read quite widely about photography’s history and famous photographers of various schools, and I also began to photograph more regularly (before, my photographing was mostly to document family or special occasions). In the past five years, I’ve gotten very excited about the similarities between writing and photography– especially the evocative power of imagery. I have way too many creative muses to count– from the various regular-folks posters on Instagram (a cool source for flat lays and expanding techniques) to my darling nieces to landscapes and everyday objects.

What is your most memorable creative experience, if any?

This is a pretty funny one. One summer, while visiting my sister about ten years ago, we were driving down back roads. It was almost Independence Day, and we passed a giant, three-story purple gorilla-holding-a-stick-of-dynamite balloon in front of a fireworks stand. I asked for a turn-around, and the resulting photo was one of my first published photos. How often do you run across a giant gorilla balloon in your everyday travels? I love the spontaneity of photography.

People approach creativity in such different ways! What about you? What is your creative routine? Do you know of any quirky habits or creative superstitions?

My other creative life is as a poet, writer, and teacher. I’ve learned to set aside time by literally scheduling it as I would any other important appointment. That said, I go with the flow and my writing time might be any time of day, although it most often falls in the late afternoon, in-between my various teaching gigs. I can take 15 minutes and make the most of it; I love the challenge of taking just a few items, a little pocket of time, and seeing what I can create of it. I’m taking an online self-paced photography lecture in food photography, and the other day, around 2:30 in the afternoon, I pulled out my camera, some delicious homemade butterscotch cookies from a local baker, a $7 marble slab cutting board from a discount chain, and a deep-purple mug with light swirl designs, and took about 40 photos from various angles. It was pure play and great fun. I’d love to break into food photography, and that’s likely where I’ll keep experimenting with expanding my skills alongside making still-life images. Oh, and I also love architecture, nature, and experimental narrative portrait photography. Clearly, my curiosity and imagination finds photography endlessly fascinating territory.

Time, Tips, & Future Goals

How do you make time to do what you love to do?

I’ve become handy at taking little pockets of time and writing or photographing it like the wind.

What tips can you give novice creatives about getting started on their creative journey and about submitting their work for publication?

Begin where you are. Don’t worry about having the fanciest or newest technology (I don’t; even my digital cameras are secondhand and more than a few years old). Focus on saying something new and uniquely yours. That said: read, study, and explore the images of published photographers, both famous and up-and-coming. Start a Pinterest, Instagram, or other online collection of images that inspire you or pique your interest. Find a person or group of people who are doing what you are doing or want to do and swap ideas, whether through a class, a seminar, or just meeting at a local coffee shop or living room or online to share ideas. Just keep going, no matter what!

What do you hope to achieve with your creativity? Where would you like to see yourself in about 5 years, professionally and creatively?

Another excellent question! One of my dreams is coming true– I’ll be teaching an online course in photography for writers in March 2018 through Women on Writing, and it’s going to be a blast to combine two of my favorite passions in one class. I’d like to take that class idea and turn it into a craft book for writers who also photograph. I want to break into food photography. I’d also love to do more book-cover photography. I’ve always wanted to create a book where I combine my poems and/or prose and photographs; I’m just continuing to look for a topic or theme that would do the idea justice. I will still create a few times a week, likely still teach, and still revel in the personal experience of making something evocative from basic yet meaningful tools. Thank you for this wonderful opportunity to daydream specific details about a topic that I’ve already been considering more lately and for your support of my photos. It’s a pleasure to be a contributor!

— TWD Magazine 3rd Collection—

About Melanie

TWD Magazine 3rd Collection Interview: Melanie Faith — Photography Contributor
Melanie Faith is an English professor, tutor, auntie, and photographer. Her poetry is forthcoming in Poems in the Waiting Room and her photography series will be published in The Scene & Heard Journal (fall 2017). She was featured blogger at createwritenow with Mari in early November 2017, where she discussed “3 Tips for Creating a Fulfilling Writing Practice.” Her historical poetry collection was published by FutureCycle Press (September 2017) and a craft book about writing flash fiction and nonfiction will be published by Vine Leaves Press (spring 2018). Her article “Writer in Progress: The Writer?s Idea Book, Submission Notebook, and You” will be published in Fiction Southeast in May 2018. Learn more about her latest creative projects at: melaniedfaith.com.

View Melanie’s Photography In TWD Magazine 3rd Collection

“Photography (8 Images)” — p. 123